Educator's Resource Guides


Teacher’s Resource Guide
Evolution Revolution: Simple Lessons
By Charlotte Bennardo


Evolution Revolution, Book 3: Simple Lessons / June 2017 / Ages 8-12 / $6.99-Paperback / ISBN: 978-0998499222


Word List

      Define the following:
1        1.     Sanctuary
2        2.     Animal behaviorist
3        3.     Adaptation
4        4.     Biodiversity
5        5.     Herbivore
6        6.     Carnivore
7        7.     Omnivore
8        8.     Communication
9        9.     Domesticated
1      10. ‘Fight or Flight’

Classroom/Home Activities
     1.     Find one human and two animal adaptations.

     2.     Do some research and find out which animal can learn the most words, and how many they can learn. Make a list of the top five learners.

     3.     Ask students to build, draw, or design a ‘squirrel-proof’ bird feeder.

     4.     Have the students design and make bird feeders, fill them with seed, and set them outside the classroom windows.

     5.     Have students play a game of Charades to see how difficult it is to communicate without speaking. Use the words from the word list.

     6.     Have students illustrate a scene to warn Jack of danger; either one from the book or one that he might face.

     7.     Make a list of all the things Jack has learned. Who do you think is smarter, Jack or Bandy? Explain why.

     8.     Imagine yourself as Jack. What would happen after this book? Write a paragraph about it.

Discussion Questions
1      1.     Do you think a squirrel could learn all the simple machines the way Jack did? Explain why or not.

2      2.     Is it important for scientists to capture and study animals? Do you think it would be right for scientists to keep Jack and Rat in a cage to study them? What about zoos and SeaWorld- are they good or bad?

3      3.     Have you seen animals of different species helping each other? Give an example and share it with the class.

4      4.     Are rats bad? Are there any animals that aren’t ‘necessary?’

5      5.     Should Jack just have run away once he got to the sanctuary?

6      6.     If you were Collin, would you have captured Jack and turned him in for the college money?

7      7.     What do you think will happen to Jack? To Addy? To CeeCee? Do you think they will share what they learn and teach other squirrels?

8      8.     Are Jim and Cameron ‘bad’ people, or are they just doing their jobs? Suppose you were Jim or one of the scientists and it was your job to capture and study the squirrels; what would you do?

9     9.     If you were Lauren, would you have taken Jack to another place before the men and scientists came back?
1
 10. Should wild animals be pets? What about Bandy, who never learned to live in the woods; should Lauren try to teach her how to be wild by letting her go? 


Classroom Projects
Bird House

     Supplies
     Assorted basic components: old shoe or boot, coffee can with plastic lid
     Small amount of straw or other soft bedding   
     Several feet of slim nylon rope or bendable wire, or straightened coat hangers,
     2 ½” wooden dowel or sturdy twig for each house
     Waterproof glue, like Gorilla Glue
     Waterproof, non-toxic paints, or natural elements like twigs, stones, for decorating
     Hammer and punch (or long construction nail)


     Objective
     To create a birdhouse of recycled materials.

     Procedure

      1.     Have students bring in base- old shoe or coffee can. (It should be clean of any dirt or food, etc. and cans should not have any sharp edges.)

      2.     a) For shoe houses, loosen laces to make opening larger. b) For coffee can, trace hole about 2” in diameter in center of plastic lid. Cut hole, making sure there are no sharp edges.

     3.     Have teacher use punch and hammer to make hole in toe of shoe/boot or in lid about ½” under hole.

     4.     Insert wooden dowel or stick in hole and glue to create perch.

     5.     Let students decorate shoe/can with paints or natural elements.

     6.     a) If shoe or boot has loop at heel of shoe, thread nylon rope or wire through and tie/twist to make hanger. b) For cans, punch 2 holes on side of can for wire or rope to fit through, and knot or bend ends to secure.

     7.     Add bits of hay or soft bedding, and a few seeds to entice birds.

     8.     Hang in tree.

     9.     Have students discuss how and where inclined planes help people in everyday situations (i.e. loading ramps, wheelchair ramps, etc.)

     10. For pictures of finished houses or for more ideas, go to: http://www.lushome.com/15-smart-recycling-ideas-making-unique-birdhouses/141768


Bird or Squirrel Feeder

       Supplies
       Popsicle sticks: 38 per feeder
1     Larger stick, like tongue depressor or slim, sturdy twig per project
       Waterproof glue, like Gorilla Glue
       2 pieces of 2’ length slim nylon twine
       Square of wax paper for each project (to protect work surface from glue)
       Seeds and nuts

       Objective
       To create a bird or squirrel feeder.

       Procedure

       1.     Give each student a length of wax paper to work on.

       2.     Lay out 12 sticks next to each other to form an even square.

       3.     Have students glue 2 sticks across the 12, leaving ½” of bottom sticks clear.

       4.     Glue tongue depressor (or slim twig) on top.

       5.     Alternate sticks to form levels: ll = ll = .

       6.     When 4 sticks remain, have students tie ends of twine around sticks at corners.
      Secure with glue.

       7.     Glue remaining sticks. Let dry overnight.

       8.     Hang in tree.

       9.     Add seeds and nuts to entice birds and squirrels.

       For pictures of completed project, go to: http://www.craftionary.net/make-birdhouses-garden/


     Additional Resources for Further Reading and Discovery


         Doudna, Kelly. The Kids' Book of Simple Machines: Cool Projects & Activities that Make Science Fun! Mighty Media Kids 2015.(Kindle only)



         Hodge, Deborah. Simple Machines (Starting with Science). Kids Can Press, 1997. ISBN 978-1550743999.

         Wells, Robert E. How Do You Lift a Lion? Albert Whitman, 1996. ISBN 978-0807534212.

         Woods, Michael. Ancient Machines: From Wedges to Waterwheels (Ancient Technology). Runestone Press, 1999. ISBN 978-0822529941.

         Yasuda, Anita and Stone, Bryan. Explore Simple Machines!: With 25 Great Projects (Explore Your World) Nomad Press, 2011. ISBN 978-1936313872






Teacher’s Resource Guide
Evolution Revolution: Simple Plans
By Charlotte Bennardo
 Evolution Revolution, Book 2: Simple Plans / January 2017 / Ages 8-12 / $5.99-Paperback / ISBN: 978-0998499208

Word List
     Define the following:
1          1. Work
2        2. Energy
3        3. .Habitat
4        4.  Instinct
5        5. Predator
6        6. Prey
7        7. Life cycle
8        8. Mynah bird
9        9. Mimic
1      10. Scavenger

Classroom/Home Activities

1.     Have students design and draw a picture of a wagon that birds and other hopping animals might be able to use.

2.     Create a list of words for students to ‘teach’ through charades and simple pictures, the way Collin taught Jack.

3.     Ask students to make a list of five words they think Jack should learn, and tell how they would teach him.

4.     Have students draw a life cycle in Jack’s woods which includes major characters: Jack, Owl, Fox, Bird, Beaver, Rabbit, Chipmunk, and Rat.

5.     Let students draw scenes from the book not pictured; Jack on Speaking Rock, Sister, Rat scaring the humans, etc.


  
Discussion Questions

1      1. If Jack was your friend, what would you try to teach him?

2      2.  Tell who you think is smarter, and why- Jack or Rat?

3      3.   Is there an animal smarter than a squirrel? Why do you think so?

4      4.   How do you think Jack’s story will end?

5      5.  What change, by evolution, would be best for squirrels, and give your reason. (i.e. opposable thumbs to build).

6      6.  Has Jack’s story made you think differently about the animals in your backyard, or the world?

7      7.  Which is your favorite animal: Jack, Rat, Owl, Sister, Bird, Horse or other? Give a reason.

8     8.  If you could add something to the story, like Jack meeting another human, or a new animal that comes into the woods, what would it be? Write a few sentences describing what happens.

9     9.  Do you think Jack could learn to use a cell phone? A computer? Why or why not?

1   10.  How do you think Jack could use a pulley? Describe one and how he might use it.

  
Classroom Experiment

   Supplies
   1 small box for each student or group of 2 (have several sizes)
   Tape
   Scissors
   Straight plastic straws (not bendable)
   Cardboard
   String
   Small stuffed animal for each student or group

   Objectives
   To build a wagon appropriately sized to fit the stuffed animal.
   To learn teamwork, determining scale of wagon to accomplish project

   Procedure

1     1.   Have students place box next to animal and determine if box is too big, small or      right sized for wagon. Have them trade with other students so each has proper size or    cut down to fit.
2     2.   Have students draw and cut out wheels for wagon.
3     3.   After wheels are cut, have them make holes in center to fit straw. Clip ends of        straw so it separates like a banana peel. Tape ends to wheel to form axles. They should  make sure axles fit width of box.
       4.  Wheels and straw axles are to be taped to underside of wagon.
5     5.  Give each student or team a length of string for them to create a harness to fit  stuffed animal to wagon.
       6.  Let students demonstrate to classmates how well their wagon works and how the harness fits the stuffed animals.

   
Additional Resources for Further Reading and Discovery

  
Doudna, Kelly. The Kids' Book of Simple Machines: Cool Projects & Activities that Make Science Fun! Mighty Media Kids 2015.(Kindle only)



Hodge, Deborah. Simple Machines (Starting with Science). Kids Can Press, 1997. ISBN 978-1550743999.

Shireman, Myrl. Strengthening Physical Science Skills for Middle and Upper Grades. Mark Twain Media, 2007, ISBN 978-1580374538.

Wells, Robert E. How Do You Lift a Lion? Albert Whitman, 1996. ISBN 978-0807534212.

Woods, Michael. Ancient Machines: From Wedges to Waterwheels (Ancient Technology). Runestone Press, 1999. ISBN 978-0822529941.

Yasuda, Anita and Stone, Bryan. Explore Simple Machines!: With 25 Great Projects (Explore Your World) Nomad Press, 2011. ISBN 978-1936313872 




Teacher’s Resource Guide
Evolution Revolution: Simple Machines
By Charlotte Bennardo
 Evolution Revolution, Book 1: Simple Machines / October 2016 / Ages 8-12 / $5.99-Paperback / ISBN: 978-1534903210

Word List

   Define the following:
   1. Machine
1      2. Simple machine  
2      3. Axle  
3      4. Lever 
4      5.     Pulley
        6.     Force
        7.     Inclined plane
        8.     Wedge
        9.     Screw
      10.  Evolution


Classroom/Home Activities

1.     Find 5 examples of the simple machines in your school, home, and other places (lever, wheel/axle, pulley, inclined plane, wedge, screw).

2.     Tell which is the most popular, and why you think so.

3.     Ask students to build, draw, or design a ‘machine’ using all 6 simple machines.

4.     Tell how your pets may use simple machines: rolling a ball, walking up ramps, spinning in a hamster wheel, opening doors with a lever handle.

5.     Ask students to decide which simple machine is the most important, the one that has helped humans the most; the wheel, the inclined plane, the screw, and give a reason why. Show it in pictures or drawings.


  
Discussion Questions

1   1.     Which animals do you think are as smart as, or smarter than, a squirrel? Explain why. If possible, give an example how this is true.

2   2.     If you have a pet, do you think it could learn all the things that Jack has learned? 

3   3.     Do you think that your pet or other animals around you could or would share what they’ve learned?

4   4.     Is it possible that animals could outsmart humans one day? 

5   5.     Compare Fox and Jack. Is Fox smarter because of his hunting skills, or Jack because of the things he’s learned?

6   6.     If Jack came to your house, what would you like to teach him, and why?

7   7.     For the animals that couldn’t learn how to roll, like Snake or Rabbit, how could they help in the battle? Do they have any skills they could share?

8   8.     Explain an example of evolution. Is evolution happening today? Can you give an example?

9   9.     Are humans evolving? Show an example if you think so.

1  10. Name a way humans could evolve that would make them better able to live.  
  
Classroom Experiment

   Supplies
   1 gal plastic jar of water
   1 small bowling or heavy ball
   1 tape measure/ruler
   1 board, 2-3 feet
   Several books to stack up approximately 1 foot high

   Objective
   To examine the force necessary to lift a gallon of water vs. rolling the bowling/heavy    ball.
   To examine the force necessary to lift a gallon of water and bowling ball vs. using an    inclined plane

   Procedure

1     1.   Have students mark out in chalk or tape a length of 3 feet (or however long board         is).
2     2.   Ask each student to carry the gallon of water the length marked out. 
3     3.   Then have them roll the bowling/heavy ball; which is easier? Requires less effort?
4     4.   Have students stack books and build a small inclined plane. 
5     5.   Have students carry gallon of water and ball up the inclined plane (being careful to       help guide and keep them from falling). 
6     6.   Ask students to first drag the gallon of water. Is it easier to lift and carry, or drag up       the plane?
7     7.   Then have students roll the ball up the plane. Is it harder to carry the ball rather             than roll it?
8     8.  Have students discuss how and where inclined planes help people in everyday               situations (i.e. loading ramps, wheelchair ramps, etc.)



Additional Resources for Further Reading and Discovery


Doudna, Kelly. The Kids' Book of Simple Machines: Cool Projects & Activities that Make Science Fun! Mighty Media Kids 2015.(Kindle only)



Hodge, Deborah. Simple Machines (Starting with Science). Kids Can Press, 1997. ISBN 978-1550743999.

Wells, Robert E. How Do You Lift a Lion? Albert Whitman, 1996. ISBN 978-0807534212.

Woods, Michael. Ancient Machines: From Wedges to Waterwheels (Ancient Technology). Runestone Press, 1999. ISBN 978-0822529941. 

Yasuda, Anita and Stone, Bryan. Explore Simple Machines!: With 25 Great Projects (Explore Your World) Nomad Press, 2011. ISBN 978-1936313872 





Beware the Little White Rabbit
 Alice Through the Wormhole, by Charlotte Bennardo 
ISBN: 978-1-61603-042-1


Teacher's Discussion Guide:

1.  Which story was your favorite, and why? Which was your least favorite?

2.  How do the different settings and genres affect the tales?

3.  Is the White Rabbit symbolic of something in the stories, or just a literary device to move the story along, like a catalyst?

4.  Do you feel the authors were true to the character of the original Alice? Defend your answer.

5.  Is there one particular story that 'spoke' to you? Why?

6.  How do you feel about other authors using a well-known character like Alice in fan fic?

7.  What has changed about Alice from what you remember in the original story to how she appears in any/all of these, besides the fact that she's grown up?

8.  Is there any setting, scene, character, or plot that you feel doesn't work?

9. What was your favorite scene? Your least favorite?

10. If you could write a story about Alice as you see her, what setting, genre, conflict, or era would you choose?




Blonde OPS 
 by Charlotte Bennardo and Natalie Zaman
ISBN: 978-1-250-03039-9


Teacher's Discussion Guide:

1. Is it 'ethical' for Bec to hack, deceive her boss and friends, and 'break and enter' to find out who hurt Parker?

2. When is it ethical to break the law?

3. Because of her 'hacks,' i.e. changing her grades that got her expelled, going into Kevin's financial accounts, and getting into people's cars, should there be some punishment for her? Should she be banned from using a computer? 

4. Is Bec's simultaneous interest in Dante and Taj problematic?

5. Would you have broken the law to save the First Lady and help Parker?

6. How does the Rome setting enhance the story?

7. Was there anything that detracted from the story - a character, an incident, some detail?

8. Who was your favorite character, and why?

9. What do you think is Bec's biggest weakness? Her strongest talent?

10. How does Bec's initial appearance and dress reflect her personality (pink hair, almost goth clothes) and how does it change after her adventure? 





Sirenz Back in Fashion 
by Charlotte Bennardo and Natalie Zaman
ISBN 978-0-7387-3187-2


Teacher's Discussion Guide:
  
 1. Have Meg and Shar changed from their previous encounter with Hades and the other gods of the Greek pantheon? Has Hades? Has Persephone?

2. Does Hermes fit your idea of an ancient Greek god brought into the modern world like Hades and the others?

3. How has Hades changed 'the rules of the game' for Shar and Meg?

4. Romantic and platonic relationships have changed from the previous book. Discuss how, and what changed the relationship.

5. Share doesn't have any siren gifts; what is her advantage/disadvantage in getting the better of Hades, or just completing her part of the deal.

6. Meg has the power--or does she?

7. Would you have done things differently if you were Shar, like gave in to Hades? If you were Meg, would you have sent Paulina to the Underworld? If you were Hades or Persephone, would you ave done anything differently?

8. Sirenz Back in Fashion has two settings; Shar in the Underworld and Meg in their NYC dorm. How does each help/hinder them? How would you envision Tartarus?

9. What advice would you give to the girls in handling the gods? Do you think they can avoid Hades? What possible situation could arise that would bring them all together again?

10. Is there anything you'd want badly enough that you'd make a deal with Hades?

11. Which character are you most like and why, and which one would you like to be, and why?

12. Did it surprise you to see characters like Ben Franklin in Tartarus? Who would you like to meet in Tartarus- which figure from ancient through modern times?

13. Hades is a complex character; the Underworld appears dark, foreboding, and at times, horrible, yet there is beautry there that he created. Consider his relationship with Cerberus. How does this explain the 'man' behind the god?





Sirenz 
by Charlotte Bennardo and Natalie Zaman
ISBN: 978-0-7387-2319-8


Teacher's Discussion Guide:

 1. How is Meg and Shar’s Hades different from the Hades of ancient mythology? How is he the same? What about the other gods the girls encounter during the course of their adventure?

2. Do Meg and Shar have any other possible options than going to jail or accepting Hades’ offer? What would you do differently than Meg and Shar?

3. In what ways is Hades similar to modern visions of the devil? Discuss and compare the traditional Judeo-Christian order of the Universe to that which exists in Sirenz.

4. Discuss the importance of rules and consequences in Sirenz. Are rules broken? Are there fair consequences when an infraction happens?

5. How do the differences between Meg and Shar increase tension and make their task more difficult?

6. How do the girls work past their differences?

7. What is the role and importance of differences in relationships—platonic and romantic? That considered, discuss the pairings and potential pairings in the book: Meg & Shar, Shar & Jeremy, Meg & Jeremy, Shar & Hades, Persephone & Hades.

8. Why does Hades give the girls their specific Siren gifts, a look from Shar, a word from Meg, to entrance their victim? How does this affect their ability to complete their task? Does it change either of them in any way?

9. Is Arkady Romanov victim or villain? Would you have sent him to Hades? Why or why not?

10. By the end of the book, what traits have the girls adopted from each other? How have they changed?

11. If you could, would you make a deal with Hades? What would you want, and what do you think he would ask of you?

12. What happens next for Meg and Shar? Could Hades come back to haunt them? If so, how? What could he have them do next? 13. Sirenz is set in New York. What is the role of the city in the book—just a backdrop or something more?

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